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20131028
20131105
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freed man. the idea of neoliberalism is there should be massive, selective tax cuts. margaret thatcher it is there is no alternative. of course that's absurd. there was an alternative. we have to connect the dots to understand what is going on today. i read the chronicle. so what i've done is put together a montage of the murder of public sector, which is going on everyday. in fact all of the public sector is in body shape. public libraries, parks from the municipal to the national level. our character is among the worst in the world. the new deal deals with things in a different way. when i was going to school, california school's were the best. now they are among the worst with the new budget cuts. of course, my university is being privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against fu
with our payroll tax to attract businesses -- to give a payroll tax exemption for new hires is not a good policy. changing from a payroll tax to a gross receipts tax, where it is not based on the number of employees you have and how much they are paid, but how much business you have, your business, is a better tax structure that does not harm businesses to hire more people. harman is a strong word, but does not attach the tax to your number of employees. it is a better structure, i believe. we do a lot of things to support businesses. muni improvements happening downtown, in the more distant parts of the city. supporting businesses. infrastructure we are putting in, sidewalks, lighting. all of this is important to businesses. lots of concentration on that in the downtown area. i see it as one of the big thing that we offer. we also have a pretty city. that attracts a lot of businesses. we have certain parts of the city that have really great thinking going on. you see california, as of state. our hospitals attract a lot of minds and attention. -- uc california, sf state. >> it looks like
tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
, but certainly large entertainment venues will attract a lot of customers and bring in tax dollars for the city if we do this. >> strictly from a security perspective we have the problems at night. we are flooding the streets with drunk people, with more people at one time than any other time throughout the night and it's taxing on laughed, taxing on security and neighborhood. so having a staggered approach, not every venue should be able to go to 4:00 a.m. and i agree with that. bars go to a certain point and maybe there is a clear definition of those industries and subcategories are. absolutely it's a necessary tool for us to make sure that we limit the amount of violence that happens every night. >> that's a difficult question for law enforcement standpoint. i think it's a good time for another trivia question. [ laughter ] which seated commissioner was tinker bell at disneyland. we take pride in ourselves to the police department to be very open minded and i think that most of the venues that deals with the security or patrons or entrepreneurs will know that we are very open minded and we l
to over 2 thousand but they couldn't pay that kind of tax for that growth and we are the only couldn't in the state of california that had the payroll tax to chu and i and kim got together with tweeter and thought we could forge something but not just give it to them therefore we looked at the whole of market street. we used to having some great places on market street and i understand some of the history that occurred there part of it was because we didn't do transportation well, that caused a lot of the businesses downfall so we survived with a challenge we we felt maybe this was the way to do is it is create an area where we can provide that tax break but only if you locate this and deliver on the jobs you promised. that was a good 2-way street that started an important conversation 0 how we talk with new companies and visit them in do seduce their needs. we have today 4 thousand 8 hundred technical companies because. and i count every single one of the folks that work there >> the consumption on mid market goes from 10 the street to an. we got some pretty good skews because with
across the age span. . >> many of our clients are working poor. they pay their taxes. they may run into a rough patch now and then and what we're able to provide is a bridge towards getting them back on their feet. the center averages about 14,000 visits a year in the health clinic alone. one of the areas that we specialize in is family medicine, but the additional focus of that is is to provide care to women and children. women find out they're pregnant, we talk to them about the importance of getting good prenatal care which takes many visits. we initially will see them for their full physical to determine their base line health, and then enroll them in prenatal care which occurs over the next 9 months. group prenatal care is designed to give women the opportunity to bond during their pregnancy with other women that have similar due dates. our doctors here are family doctors. they are able to help these women deliver their babies at the hospital, at general hospital. we also have the wic program, which is a program that provides food vouchers for our families after they have thei
in the charter but it didn't tell you where that money comes from there has to be taxes in the in the meantime to come up with that money. so the question i would then prop is that prop a leafs unanswered is that where is the money going to come from and we shouldn't put ourselves on the hook >> supervisor farrell. >> thank you. the money isn't coming out of thin air but prop b this mauntdz that the city employees contribute 2 percent of their pay. and the city for 2008 matches that with one percent so new employees from as of 2009 two percent of their health care is being saved it's not coming from taxpayers in san francisco it's from city applies from the city and county of san francisco >> mr. murphy. >> sure so one of the troubling points of prop a there's a catch all in the amendment that the contributions of the employee and accident planned contribution by the city are insufficient to meet the requirements of the truth you fund the city is on the hook for the balance. which means in practical terms we have to cut from somewhere else or raise taxes. and the picture of retiree health
to reforming our unfair job punishing business tax. we've injected a healthy dose of fiscal discipline with two-year budgeting, five-year financial planning, and a 10-year capital plan to get to us this point. but it's been worth it. san francisco's credit ratings have been upgraded by every rating agency in the past year, making our tax dollars go further when we deliver capital projects, and giving our city even more investor confidence. so, now it is not the time to take our eyes off the ball. we have to continue reforms to protect our city's economic recovery and make our city safe, solvent, and successful. like taking meaningful action to address our $4.4 billion of unfunded retiree health care liability. thank you, supervisor mark farrell, for taking this on. you have my full support on this important issue. (applause) >> while reforms and sacrifices have spared us deep cuts we've experienced during the deepest part of our economic downturn, we still have much work to do. this year's projected $123.6 million general fund shortfall and next year's $256 million shortfall requires strategic
's hear from our young entrepreneurs. your creating jobs and paying taxes when you hear this from people what you do you say >> i've definitely paid hoof taxes. the short answer is yeah, the silicon valley if that were not true. it would be like the - i know i've spent a lot of time with interesting people from all over the world and their successful people and their passionate about being here and their contributing to the economy >> i like to give the example of football. imagine the 49ers and we're going to be playing with another team but what if it is other team had 13 or fourteen people. we have to see the u.s. as a team are the other countries and we're limiting the team on the field and if canada is allowing their team to to compete against us. to not allow the 49ers to come to the game is not making sense. you want to have the largest team i can in order to beat the competition and so i have this commercial in their head. all those comments immigrants are lazy and taking our jobs. imagine the same comments have been made as each immigration wave like the italians and now the m
we have the kids to take those wonderful jobs and so i hate to us the word taxes by how can we crate of the revenue that the fed's have left us to do. we're in poverty and we need our cities to step up >> thank you, mayor lee. >> (laughter) . well, that first of all, we have is a pretty r06b9 budget and we do - by the way, i think in order to depreciate the kind of revenue we first of all, begin with the basics we have to have a strong business approach to our budget so creating that san francisco in the industry was small business owner something i spent a lot of time. i tackled pension reform and created a trust fund so start paying for the mandatory that would hurt us dead on arrival down the road. so we contact talk about stuff until we've built an san francisco. today we've done all the things that insurance companies and other fails i failures of other cities across the country didn't pay attention to all those mandates we put them into the mix and now we do 2 year budgeting and we've got 4 reserve accounts for the city. now that we've done that companies can come in and say
taxes pr is there any way for the immigration officers to interpreter the law like they do in japan >> what a great question and compelling question. >> our office does a lot of reviews in the immigration issues. i have a colleague here and he's our senior advisors. fred and i work very closely in giving adjudication issues as they relate to a start up business whether in the h b context we're very involved and providing recommendations to ac i s in how to improve + jurisdictions in policy and training. we welcome our comments and ideas but case examples that reflect miss application of the laws. make sure you have our card before i leave and a maria thank you for responding >> we have two speakers and literally are out of time. >> my name is juan gomez i gntd from columbia. i wanted to ask i talk about what you can do in the middle america i move forward from kansas city so i know that middle america looks up to san francisco. so what can the city's do not only the tech world is leading the world but in the technology industries they're not as progressive as in the tech communi
in certain specified clarifications. less applicable taxes and withholding for the pending charge and realize of all possibly claims or implementation of the special information system. item u other informational items there are no staff reports and we're now at - >> i want to make one announcement we have a shorter one that i want to annuities to everyone listening. >> nicely done. a with that, i'm going to adjourn the meeting interest thank you >> everyone. thank you. my name is carl i'm the president of the silicon leadership groufrp we're happy you joined us for a town hall with mayor ed lee with the obama administration on the action on immigration founded here just a few blocks away. that what matters is we have a mare that understands the issues a nearest and dear it to us and that's immigration reform. since it's inception we've gotten over 20 visas alone and the feeling is we have a shortage on green talent when we need to go through the steps we need to go through and for the tech community we're focused on opening up our technical school to the global community. we're in a talen
me in the city so i can create new jobs and new businesses that are going to drive tax revenue to this city? >> a great point and great question and appreciate the opportunity to speak directly to it. as you all know, liquor licensing is a formulated thing and allowances for number of liquor license within particular communities and counties is in fact limited by among other things but chiefly a population. we all know that san francisco's population itself is not that great in comparison to its transitory population that is here for it's entertainment, right? so it could be argued that there are not enough liquor licenses to serve not only the people that live here which is the way the legislation was created. i believe it's somewhere in the neighborhood of a full on sale liquor licenses for every 2,000 residents in the area but the hundreds of thousands of people that come from these bridges and highways and airplanes to be entertained for the wonderful food and nightlife that is here. so yes, one could argue that the formula doesn't work for something like this and there s
, you're taxing us to death. we did a big payroll tax revision as a result of that. there is just simply -- i think a relationship where there's no quid pro quo, we do it for good policy reasons that we articulate and are clear about. and that's the way we should be running government. that's also the way we should have that clean relationship with businesses. >> mayor, [speaker not understood]. >> yeah, i mean that's why we hired mark tuitu for [speaker not understood]. my competitive spirit with mayor bloomberg in new york, rahm emanuel in chicago, we're always exchanging information about you got this, you got that. our staffs and our department heads do the same. , and so, we're always saying, they did this. how come we can't do that? and the message gets shared with neighborhood leaders as well ~. so, i get this a lot from neighborhood leaders, how come we don't have wi-fi in all of our parks? how come you always concentrate on golden gate, for example, but not on balboa? these are the kind of things i think we're wanting to make a statement on. i think, for example, our police depa
including whether or not to raise taxes and fees. how will you approach these tough choices? >> i think that when we talk about raising fees or taxes, we always have to come at it from a very balanced approach. we have a lot of homeownerses, we have a lot of tenants in the city. and, so, again balance is really key. i think we also have to approach the budget and some tough fiscal issues looking at the city-wide budget as a whole and not just looking at specific sectors or issue areas that we real have i to look at the city's financial standing as a whole for the long term. that's really important and that's definitely what drives a lot of my decision-making process. and i think it's also tougher in san francisco because we really are held to a very high standard where we have to balance the budget every single fiscal year. we cannot run into a deficit in the new fiscal year. we cannot print more money. we are held to a high standard by our charter and, so, i think that's why these tough decisions are made every year rent. >> what other issues do you feel are facing san francisco? >> i
is looking for supervision, but again as you might imagine the resources are severely taxed. and during the budget difficulties in the last years, the ability to manage large numbers. we are talking for example, homeless individuals, we see 30 individuals at any one given time. that's the active case load and it's driven by that. >> i have a question from the public defender for the law enforcement officials here. what reforms can you commit to at this point to reduce pretrial detention population? shall we start with sheriff mirkarimi or the district attorney? >> i will reiterate that the strategy that i think san francisco should seriously consider legislate a new criteria. that's what the penal code has empowered us to do. we could start right away by corralling a number of legislators and city hall to get behind this effort completely. and i suggest budgetary wise pretrial as will represents is not funded enough. frankly. and our ability to i think really discharge in a supervised capacity so there is an alternative to incarceration is something that the city should put on a higher
dollars before taxes. and we are honored to have doris ward with us tonight. [ applause ] >> and i can't emphasize enough how critical and how influential and how just fundamental these three people have been and are to the work of civil rights and human rights in san francisco. [ applause ] i would also like to recognize someone who is very special to us, the commissioners, forward hrc commissioner who was present at the 1963 march on washington. she is here with her husband. flees join us in honoring frankie jill e t and maxwell. >> before we go to this year's nominees and awardees, i would like to recognize the nominees for this year's awards who were ultimately not selected but who because of their tr work were nominated by their contemporaries, their contemporaries in the community. dr. caesar churchwell. [ applause ] officer fred crisp. [ applause ] >> mr. michael mcenolate. [ applause ] >> so at this point i will ask miss polk who is a staff member for the hrc who is fundamentally responsible for tonight's proceedings to assist us in distributing the awards. >> so, first, we ha
. they are buying houses, paying taxes, money is going into the school district, kids are being educated. we are raising help the community. >> thank you so much for joining us on sfgtv's "meet your supervisor." we will be back with another one of our 11 supervisors. >> a few years ago, i attended a public event at sfaliason, i don't know if you were there but it had a huge impact on me. i went to hear alaferalaison speak and instead a heard a neuro biologist and a snow flake scientist and tj clark who is an arc historian. it was amazing, it was the most amazing night. and we have actually modeled our public programs off of that event ever since. we like at the arts commission to broad a broader dialogue around the works that we show. not just having the artists themselves present, but to present different ways of thinking about their work, different ways of thinking about contemporary art in general. and leaving you thinking, as you leave. so, tonight we have someone from young and we have a photographer who is not in the show, alongside of our current existing artists. if you like this pro
counterand closer invention and in subject years we've added free tax and workforce development resources. metro a new provides services to over 7 thousand families annually. we take a holistic integrated service delivery because we're dedicated to insuring that latino families get all the resources they need to be successful. the mission promise neighborhood is based on this philosophy of integrated approach to communities development the promise of the mission promise neighborhood is that all students and all families in the mission district will be successful both academicly and economically in the mission promise neighborhood we believe that economic success is that fundamental to academic extensive and the mission promise neighborhood we're working on both. it's my pleasure to introduce to you mayor lee. he and his office have long been instrumental in the success of the admission neighborhood. they've porl they're a true partner in the work. under his leadership because of certify environment in economic groebl growth san francisco has been spared the deficit of years past but has g
million dollars in new tax credits we've raised $10 million in private contributions to date from our mayors board and a if i other good friends of ac t. today, i'm to nouns one gift it's a $5 million equivalent from an awe moms duo donor. with those gifts our campaign is 6 and a half million dollars (clapping) arrest so we're getting close but we need hope kari and a allen told me to say that percent this is as picasso said it's first an act of distribution so bring down the hammer. next up my good friend and an awesome mayor, mayor ed lee (clapping) >> thank you well jeff and kari congratulations. i've just been allotted a tour with s o m and plant organizations to take a at the theatre. let me tell you it is transform active for this corridor. i know how hard supervisor wiener and kim and mark leno when we all had been thinking about how to reinvest in this whole life corridor on market street. we were waiting for moments like this. to truly signal a big transformation change along market street and k c e t strand is wonderful you'll see the 3 hundred seats in the theatre and wond
. he split the file the other version requires a cu within a thousand foot buffer but wants to tax and they moved it forward. also at the land use committee was supervisor avaloss ordinance to have a report to the board of supervisors vaulting the current controls for medical dispenses. the planning staff informed them we've started the work because it will take a little bit of work. we're tentatively seeking a place open 9 december 5th hearing for the report. at the land use committee there were 2 hours for medical use dispenses it was opposition to any new regulation. and this item was also forwarded to the full board with a positive recommendation. on tuesday the board heard the appeal at 480 pa trespasser this was for a negative deck mrargs. at the last hearing supervisors cowen who's district contains this had questions related to parking. supervisor cowen reviewed the new standards and announced the standards at the last hearing and this answered her questions. she felt the concerns were also about sequa and with that the commissioner asked that the sequa be upheld. and then
policies not only tax breaks by where zoning is and to find space to match where people are. we're lucky to be in the city we have to do it right things to keep this momentum going. it's critical this time period but we must have those meeting with our technology leader so with that i'd like to introduce chris anderson 3-d robotics (clapping) >> terrific thank you. and thank you for coming. a so as the mayor said this is part of a listening tour that's part of the forum is to help with the policies and the mayor staff about what they should be doing to advance what we know it is a growing movement. the manufacturing is cool again. things have changed this is not the 1970s or the sort of grinding san mateo task miles. it's digital manufacturing made it to the desktop. and it looks like software but it's in it's innovations side looked like hardware. we're fortunate to have a number of panel itself but it's important to talk about what the future looks like in the bay area to get our questions and the mayor's staff is going to hopefully take notes. so from the left the founder of other l
taxes how will you approach those. well, that first of all, i'd like to say as i mentioned earlier when i was the executive director of an organization and being on the budget committee for 8 years. one of the things i've learned from being an administrator i does not - my values would be we don't spend more than what we have and if we don't have enough there's two things you can do you can cut things or look for more revenues. for me, i would be taking the same approach how to generate more revenues for the services the city needs. and if we need to cut we don't have the revenues where do we cut. those are some basic things i believe we need to protect the safety net forepeople that are the most vulnerable and education issues would be very high on my priority particularly childcare. the services for zero to 5. it's a benefit for not only the young but also for the working parents >> you mentioned varies needs for people that are vulnerable in the city what do you think about the housing needs and what should is about addressed. >> the housing needs are growing and where do we meet t
and taxes and where to make cuts. how would you approach these tough choices? >> well, fortunately i've been in the nonprofit world. i've been actively engaged in the community. i know the programs that are actually effective in serving residents. i understand what the need is from first-hand experience. and, so, i just would want to make sure that i'm paying very close attention to detail, knowing exactly what these programs provide, knowing exactly what's to be the partners, where the wasteful spending, how we can cutback so we can make sure we are funding the programs and the departments that need the money the most. so, it's going to be a really delicate balance. i know i have a really challenging job ahead of me. but fortunately there are other supervisors on the budget committee that also have a first-hand experience. so, i think it's going to be a tough budget process, but i think working together and looking at everything, whether it be site visits to programs or digging deep into folks' budget and talking to their -- the people that they serve and a number of other things, it's goin
. a larger cost on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last
and whether or not to increase taxes. how will you approached these hard choices? >> our budget is one of the very top challenges facing city government right now. over each of the years i have served, we have had to balance budget deficits that were around $500 million. this year, we're facing another budget deficit of almost $400 million. fortunately in recent years, we have had some ability to do some one-time budgeting tricks that allow us to balance the budget that do not exist this year. in past years, we've received federal stimulus money. we received more monies from the state government. last year our labor unions decided to contribute a quarter of a billion dollars to help balance last year's and this year's budget. those are things we do not have the ability to avail ourselves of us we balance the upcoming budget in a few months. we are faced with far fewer options. i think we are going to have to continue to look at very deep and difficult cuts. our priorities have to be insuring and protecting the most basic city services and helping to ensure that we have services to the
is on the top right there. so the main entry and a large open stair taxes i know to the second floor. up to where the elevator is at any time like you want to come into your living room but it's going to be a community building it defrauds everybody from the neighborhood not just a sector. the staff building is off to the left. so the testing and treatment center is on the second floor it has a large lounge air. there's the receptionist desk and there are some staff offices and doctors office and the top facility is having a large lobby area towards the front that have social activities and social consulting rooms and a room for the staff at the rear >> are there any questions? >> we may have questions for you. we'll tank public comments. is there mingle by project sponsor? open this up for public comment if there's any? >> good afternoon. i'm andrea i'm the executive director there and we just wanted to firm our support for this great and exciting project and really building that combining all three of those project will bring clients and staff to help activate castro street and bri
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)